Aspergers Resources for

Aspergers syndrome and High Functioning Autism

Aspergers syndrome and high functional autism are considered separate diagnoses along the spectrum of autistic disorders. Even so, there are many similarities between the disorders so that some consider them to be different labels for the same condition.

Both those with Aspergers syndrome and those with high functioning autism have difficulties with sensory functioning and cannot tolerate certain noises or certain kinds of tactile stimuli. By definition, those with either disorder have an IQ which is at, near or above the normal intelligence range. Both conditions involve a child or adult who has learned to function in society or in their surroundings by relying on the skills they happen to be good at.

Children with high functioning autism and those with Aspergers syndrome think better in visual terms. They see pictures in their heads when recalling something and don’t have a particularly good ability to think in words. Both diagnoses are associated with a relative inability to understand nonverbal cues and facial expressions.

The primary difference noted in the diagnostic criteria for each disorder is the finding of a greater speech delay in high functioning autistics when compared to those with Aspergers syndrome. Others feel this represents a continuum and that this shouldn’t be enough to establish one diagnosis over another. Albert Einstein, for example, was felt to have characteristics of Aspergers syndrome, yet he couldn’t speak until he was three years old.

Unfortunately, there are no specific blood tests or other diagnostic tests to differentiate between the two diagnoses. Instead the diagnosis is based on clinical judgment and observation. Some children with tentative high functioning autism will catch up on verbal skills and will carry the same diagnostic appearance that Aspergers syndrome patients do. Their IQ may be at least as high as other children labeled with Aspergers syndrome.

Children with Aspergers syndrome and high functioning autism are both high functioning and, in general, they can all read, write, speak and understand. In the end, the final subtleties between the two diagnoses may just be a matter of semantics and may not represent a true difference in diagnoses.
 


 

Click Here to Return To Parenting Aspergers

Click Here for more Aspergers articles

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Legal Information

Privacy Policy Disclaimer Terms of Service FAQ About Us

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Parenting Aspergers
Information Online,
 PO Box 789, Portsmouth
PO1 9DY United Kingdom
07981423108

Click Here To Email Us

------------------------------------------------------------------------------